This Summer Let the Grass be Greener on YOUR Side of the Fence

This Summer Let the Grass be Greener on YOUR Side of the Fence
Summer is here, which means it’s time to enjoy some time out on your deck and in the backyard. However, with the weather being extra sunny and hot, you may have noticed that your grass turning a little yellow and is not as green and vibrant as you would like.   By simply following these lawn tips, you can be the envy of every neighbor when the grass is truly greener on your side of the fence!     Water seldom but heavily when you do. The deeper the roots of your lawn, the more lush and healthier it will be. You can promote root growth if you water more once you do decide to break out the hose. Let the top 5cm of soil dry before taking to another watering. A good rule of thumb for the growing season is 1–1.5 inches (2.5–3.25 cm) of water per week, rising to 2 inches (5cm) during hot, dry weather. Stay alert for rain forecasts as this can help cut the cost of your water bill with nature’s own watering service! It’s best to water your lawn in the late morning or evening to reduce evaporation water loss (when the sun’s hot rays soak up all the water before your lawn can).     Cut your grass at the highest setting on your lawn mower. It’s ideal to mow your lawn when it is at a tall height, mainly during the summer’s hot weather. Even if you do not like like the look of a tall lawn, the taller your grass, the more shade it creates which means the more weed sprouts it will block. In addition, tall grass will also promote root growth, eliminating the chance for lawn disease. When you do mow your lawn, leave all the cut grass on your lawn to redistribute nutrients back to the growing grass. Ensure that each mow you carry out is done so in a different direction than the last to aid in grass grown more evenly.     Choose an organic fertilizer. Organic fertilizers are more rich in nutrients than synthetic. There are three numbers on the fertilizer bag that will indicate the percentage of  phosphorus, nitrogen and potassium. The most important element for a lawn is the nitrogen content, therefore it is best to find a number of nitrogen that is higher than phosphorus and potassium (a 3:1:2 ratio is ideal). It’s best to steer clear of numbers above 10 since these can burn your lawn!     Dethatch/aerate your lawn in the spring or autumn. Once a year it is important to de-thatch and aeration your lawn. Remove an average amount of soil plugs utilizing a lawn aerator with diameter tines. Doing this once a year will fight disease and buildup.